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This was my splash page two years ago, when I photographed Heather Abriel and physician, David Abriel on West Main Street. A former GP and palliative care specialist, he and and his wife were musicians. His instrument was bagpipes and  medieval stringed instruments; hers, the harp. They were also well known as living representatives of Father Christmas and Mrs. Christmas at the annual Mahone Bay Father Christmas Festival. They were killed in a car crash February 2, 2017. This year's festival was dedicated to their memory.



A week before the festival opened, two days of rain were promised. However, Saturday was warm and sunny and exceeded the forecast air temperatures. E&R were up and about and prepared travel to Edgewater Street by 8:30 am.



The first settlers of Mahone Bay were largely German-speaking Lutherans,  driven from the southern parts of their country during the Thirty Year's War. They still have large congregations in Lunenburg County, and have annual summer and winter flea market/craft and food sales. We always attend, as we have not met many Lutherans we did not like.




How popular is this event? Consider the parking lot.




In there church hall we purchased paperback, needed kitchen utensils and bread.



Traffic was just beginning to flow  by 8:20. This where Edgewater Street intersects Main at the Celtic Cross war memorial.  We turned right as we needed to gas up the vehicle out of town. The local Irving Station has a poor traffic pattern and was filled with cars and trucks. Off we went for Blockhouse and the Cornwall Road.



Out there on the far side of the main highway to Halifax is another less busy Irving station. The Happy Cooker Restaurant operated here for many years. It was replaced by a fish-and-chips joint when the Boys took over from Petrol Canada. It only lasted one season.




Just for the record this was the view retracing the outward five minute drive.  This road leads directly to the Town of Lunenburg.  At Blockhouse, in the valley below, a left turn takes one to Mahone Bay.



On the high land in Mahone, R&R stopped off at the former Academy, now Mahone Bay Centre,  newly renovated yet again.




That "gingerbread house" at the entrance clues kids and their parents into the fact that this is the place where the former can be parked to construct a fat and calorie-laden Christmas confection.  Misreading the calendar of events we thought the annual quilt show was up here.  It was not!



Ruth laughed and said, "I don't think so!" Oh, this was the annual tiny paintings sale. Been there done that!



We equivocated about the annual decorated Christmas House Tour, but Ruth said she was interested, but perhaps next weekend.

We were on Kinburn Street.headed for Upper West Main, having just stopped at the liquor store to ask about dark rum needed for a fruit cake recipe. Expensive, and we do not imbibe rum! We put that off.




The town seemed unusually quiet and empty when we parked here to buy the remaining ingredients.



Since I was only needed to carry parcels, I wandered about in the immediate area and took a few photos.



The bandstand overlooks Mahone Bay Harbour and some of our oldest farm homes across the water in Oakland.



Here is a view of Edgewater Street with the Anglican Church in the middle ground and the steeple of the Lutheran, in the background. That's the Anney River Estuary in the foreground beyond the bandstand.



And those are Mallard ducks in the estuary.




This was the leading male duck.




Offshore, there usually is a fog bank.



Photo of Mateus Bistro from in front of the grocery store.  The roadway is Main Street South, and blue building houses a dentistry.



An interior shot of our only local groceteria, a small shop but a very good one, which serves most of our needs.  The produce department and meat and fish, are exemplary.



The plastics plant, the only industry in town, makes pipes.  These were used to manufacture their contribution to the Christmas pageant. Back to our place off Fauxburg Road (pronounced Fox-burg).



At noon,  we made a walkout since Ruth had missed buying carrots at "Nick's Place."



690 Main Street at the bottom of our pathway.







As usual, photos are sequential. We were waling northward along Main.





Ruth's dad would have expounded, "What's this? What's this?" Kelley's work yard, at right, was quiet, but an odd contrast.




The Polar Express?



It is always nice to see happy faces and get a wave.




Sessile.



In front of the Mailman and Kelley building.




From past experience we knew that this event would be a little less crowded on the second weekend.



Directly across Main Street. That sign pointed up Fairmont.



This last-of-its-kind building houses The Hub, A Pub, the offices of the kayak rental people, the local marine water patrol.  On the third floor is the apartment of the pub owners, decorated for Christmas and a part of this year's house tour.



Access if from a left-trending stairway on the second floor.



The local made soap is found next door.



"Today's "gourmet" usually means, "Eat drink and be merry," but not in excess.



Here is where to find that market in the former Rebecca's Restaurant building.  They have gone on to greater things at Kedy's Inlet.



Only on weekends? Pity!




Immediately left. The Softub store.



The Haskup Berry outlet seen from across Main Street.



Looking northward. This view locates the Snow Queen and Father Christmas and lends scale to them.



Amos Pewter knows that less can be more, when it comes to decorating for Christmas.



Need a question answered? This is the "Welcome Centre" at 583 South Main. The quilt exhibit was in this place.



The Wool Shoppe at right,




This coy Miss was seen in the same building.



Oh My Cod Cafe was offering a Lobster Roll at $10. At street level a vendor was selling bottled water and pop.



On our side of the street at the Mahone Bay B&B.



Across Pleasant Street and ,again to the grocery store, looking across the road.



People appeared unusually relaxed.



The grocery store's Christmas decorations.




From their parking lot.



Suddenly at 2:03 pm. The Reindeer Express, powered by donations of $2 to $5. This outfit  was last in Halifax, hence the Casino ads.



Assuming that Ruth had purchased carrots...



Photo taken from the north side of the street on the return home.






Bringing home the food stuff.



At the SPA.




The wool shop genii.







Here in the Deep South people are still  taking boats out of the water.




Across the street, Bluestone Magic, a weird and wonderful place created by Brumwell. The tattoo parlour at right failed recently and has been replaced by "Nova Silver," whose products we have not seen.



"My gawd, what was that?"




There is an indent in the road at Amos Pewter's warehouse.



Mahone Bay is popular with visiting families as the flat-of-the-land in the business district favours kids and oldsters. Everyone poses for snapshots.








A lot of people probably miss looking at the harbour which is losing presence to "progress".


 
And locals are losing presence to visitors, although few can afford to complain. Note those jaywalkers?




The Softub folk were blowing bubbles, which did not clutter the atmosphere.




It was beginning to feel a lot like summer.




Ruth tried to politely explain to this tourist that a truck was waiting for her to clear the byway.




Here we see the latest waterfront condos under construction.



They are a bit bigger than promised, but as Dr Who says...



Again the guardian at the pub.




Know this Nutcracker character?




How about this one? We crossed the street.



Looking north where all the action persisted. It was warm!




My best outlook on the Mahone Bay Marina which has become a winter parking lot for pleasure craft.








Our closest B&B yet again.




View closer our footpath to The Meadows.




Everyone was jovial if not mirthful. View to the north west.

 



Almost home in a little over a half hour.




View looking back toward Main from the bend in that path.




The second day was a washout for us since rain did come at 2 pm and lasted until 4. We shopped for necessities in Bridgewater at that time. Still, all went well Sunday morning and for a part of the afternoon. Us Worry? Not a bit! Visitors have left us with five full days to view the aftermath and have fun next weekend.
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